YTH Twitterchat

#YTHHIV Tweetchat

On June 25th, just two days before National HIV Testing Day, over 30 healthcare professionals, educators, and providers convened online to have an engaging, fast-paced discussion on resources for youth HIV prevention. Participating in the national collaborative tweetchat coordinated in partnership with YTHNational Library of Medicine and AIDS.gov via the Twitter hashtag #YTHHIV, experts shared information and insights on how to address HIV in various communities.

YTHtwitterchatBoth

Images from #YTHHIV Tweetchat

Topics ranged from web-based resources and data shared from AIDS.gov, to using arts and social media for HIV education from YAHAnet (Youth, the Arts, HIV & AIDS Network).  Former YTH Youth Advisor and current TeenRISE! Program Manager Ebony Section discussed her experiences as an educator, and Dr. Emanuel from Kaiser Permanente and the Sexual Health Coalition additionally contributed his expertise as a medical provider caring for youth and young women seeking sexual health services.  Naina Khanna of the Positive Women’s Network US explained crucial policy initiatives that are being pursued to improve HIV positive women’s access to care. See the Storify recap here!

Using Twitter for Health Discussions

HIV prevention and education is a BIG topic, and the #YTHHIV dialogue gathered participants and panelists from diverse sectors in HIV and health to have a holistic discussion. While conversations about resources and information are not limited to the Twittersphere, Twitter is an accessible and useful medium to raise many voices from all over, and create connections for future partnerships and collaboration.

#YTHHIV Success

#YTHHIV was a hit! During the hour of the scheduled tweetchat, 350 unique tweets were sent out using the hashtag #YTHHIV (not including retweets). There were 33 individual participants in the conversation. Due to additional reach through retweets and Twitter feet exposure, 48,890 accounts were reached and #YTHHIV resulted in 85,568 impressions.

Content that resulted in the most retweets included messages about digital storytelling resources, social media, and National HIV Testing Day.

YTHtwitterchat3Image from TweetReach.com

A huge thanks to our partners for helping make the #YTHHIV tweetchat a success!



Categories: Recent Post

1 reply

  1. The Twitterchat was a great experience for our interns. To elaborate further, the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has several Twitter handles covering a variety of topics including @NLM_HIVplus50 (HIV/AIDS and aging adults), @NLM_4Caregivers (covering all aspects of caregiving), @NLM_OSP(news from the NLM Outreach and Special Populations Branch). We have started engaging in Twitterchats and the experience on June 25th gave our interns some really good practical experience. What we have found that works best for those thinking about participating or even hosting a Twitterchat:
    1. Follow a few Twitterchats to get an idea of the format and how they flow
    I have been in Twitterchats where there are several conversations going on at once with many participants at a very fast pace. Others are slower with a more formalized structure.
    2. Create messages ahead of time
    It is best to have tweets already to use that can be inserted into the conversation at the right time. Having several messages that are relative to the topic as well as informing the participants of your services or resources is a great way of prepared.
    3. Staffing for a Twitterchat
    Best practices and experience have shown us that having at least two staff members is good when you are just participating. You‘ll want one member ready with the prepared tweets, and another following the conversation. That person will be Favorting or Retweeting comments that they like. For the Twitterchats on June 25th we had two staff including myself and three interns. The interns really had a great time. We had everyone in one place. It made it easier to bounce ideas off each other and it added to the experience.
    These are just some general suggestions. If you have participated in or hosted a Twitterchat please share your experience on the ACIOP Blog.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: